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About Us

Formed in 2017, O'ahu Waterkeeper was the first member of Waterkeeper Alliance in Hawai'i.  Under the direction of Board President, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Waterkeeper Alliance is a global movement to protect water resources, currently uniting more than 350 Waterkeeper Organizations and Affiliates in over 40 countries.  Our collective mission is fishable, swimmable, drinkable waters.  The organization is committed to finding solutions to reduce land-based pollutants and improve water quality.   

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Pilot Projects to Improve Water Quality at Locations around O'ahu

O'ahu Waterkeeper and its partners have restored more than 10,000 native oysters to filter and improve water quality and clarity at five locations.   Oyster restoration projects are helping to elevate awareness about environmental challenges including stormwater, wastewater, water pollution, and fishing safety.  In our classroom and community presentations, O'ahu Waterkeeper staff and volunteers help people identify land-based sources of pollution and educate the public about the health of our watershed.  

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Water Quality Matters

O'ahu Waterkeeper monitors water quality at locations around O'ahu.  In partnership with Windward Community College, students are monitoring water quality in Kāne'ohe Bay.  This research will continue in 2020, and results will be shared with the community.  

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Storm Water Education

O'ahu Waterkeeper is working with community groups on a new stormwater stenciling program to raise awareness about storm water pollution and its effects on the marine environment.  Projects are planned for 2020 .  Dates will be announced.  Please stay tuned!

Volunteer today!

Ala Wai Canal & Harbor Cleanups

Giving Back

Working for a Healthier Community

Working for a Healthier Community

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Students from Damien High School joined the Ala Wai Harbor cleanup in January and picked up over 1,000 pieces of trash, including more than 200 plastic bottle caps!

Working for a Healthier Community

Working for a Healthier Community

Working for a Healthier Community

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Senator Sharon Moriwaki spoke with students in January about the health of the watershed.

Clearing Floating Debris

Working for a Healthier Community

Clearing Floating Debris

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Swimming pool nets are used to collect floating debris.  Mahalo to all of the swimming pool cleaning companies who donated nets and poles!  

Tracking Trash

Making a Difference on the Water

Clearing Floating Debris

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Volunteers collect trash and log each piece.  Data collected helps us identify the major sources of debris.

Making a Difference on the Water

Making a Difference on the Water

Making a Difference on the Water

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Volunteers on land and in canoes worked together in February to pickup trash floating on the surface of the water.

Stopping the Cycle

Making a Difference on the Water

Making a Difference on the Water

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The collection of marine life on this bottle shows the legacy of pollution in the Ala Wai. 

Monitoring the Health of the Watershed

Removing Household Trash from the Ala Wai

Monitoring the Health of the Watershed

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Volunteers pulled out over 560 pieces of trash from the water in February.

Identifying the Sources of Pollution

Removing Household Trash from the Ala Wai

Monitoring the Health of the Watershed

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Food wrappers and related packaging represent the majority of trash collected.  

Removing Household Trash from the Ala Wai

Removing Household Trash from the Ala Wai

Removing Household Trash from the Ala Wai

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Shoes, clothes, a baby carriage & other household goods were removed from the Ala Wai Canal.  We are all making an impact, and we can all help to be part of the solution.